• Arch Pain is a Real Bear!

    Pain in the arch of the foot can be a real bear to get rid of.

    Ignoring it for too long can lead to long-term pain. Often times, arch pain is a strain of the plantar fascia. It can occur if you have normal arches, flat feet, or high arches.

    Most people who experience arch pain don’t recall an injury. The pain usually occurs without any warning.

    Three things you can do at home for arch pain are stretching your calf muscles, avoiding going barefoot, and avoiding weight-bearing exercise.

    Letting this condition linger can lead to a tear of the plantar fascia. If your pain increases and occurs throughout the day, there’s a possibility that a small tear has happened.

    As is often the case with foot conditions, people who consult with us early in the onset of arch pain typically get relief faster. Many people purchase new shoes and try store-bought arch supports, but this rarely helps.

    Reading this will hopefully help you to avoid falling into that trap.

    If you have had pain in your arch(es) for more than a month, your best solution is to have us assess it to find the fastest path to relief.

    We are always happy to serve you.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466

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  • Ugly Toenail Syndrome!

    If you want to avoid Ugly Toenail Syndrome, this message is for you…

    An injured toenail can lead to an unfortunate lifelong cosmetic problem. We’ve seen many of these over the years.

    Having us evaluate an injured toenail as early as possible is your best chance of avoiding a long-term problem. Sometimes an injured toenail can be saved. Other times, removing an injured nail and having a new one grow back is the best solution.

    Another reason an injured nail should be addressed immediately is the risk of fungus. An injured toenail can create an opening for a germ like fungus to enter. If fungus invades an injured toenail, a favorable result isn’t certain.

    The best things to do for an injured toenail are to apply an antibiotic cream such as Neosporin, wear a Band-Aid on the toe, and wear looser-fitting shoes.

    An injured toenail that is loose and/or dark should be looked at immediately because the risk of infection is higher.

    Anyone with diabetes is at an even greater risk of an infection.

    Don’t take the chance of having an injured toenail become a long-term cosmetic problem. Some people can’t show their feet in public because of an injury that resulted in a permanent condition.

    It’s usually easy for us to fix an injured toenail.

    Please let us know how we can serve you best.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466

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  • Dry skin isn’t always dry skin!

    Most people don’t realize that dry skin on the bottom of the feet could be a sign of Athlete’s Foot. Dry skin isn’t always just dry skin. It doesn’t matter whether you’re 20 years old or 80 years old, dry skin could mean you have Fungus in the skin.

    Athlete’s Foot doesn’t always cause itching like we think it does. If dry skin goes untreated, it could lead to fungus in the nails. No one wants that! If dry skin doesn’t respond to the typical moisturizing creams or lotions you can get over-the-counter, then switching to an anti-fungal cream would be the best option. An inexpensive over-the-counter anti-fungal cream such as Clotrimazole is a good option. Apply it to the bottom of your feet twice a day. If you have dryness between the toes, apply a small amount there as well.

    If you have diabetes, it’s best to consult with our office before using a product like this. Some people are just genetically predisposed to the dry version of athlete’s foot.

    If you have chronically dry skin, it’s a good idea to use an anti-fungal cream just in case fungus is present.

    If you notice a yellow, white, or brown discoloration of a toenail, having it treated by us immediately is the best option. A discolored toenail left untreated can become a very ugly and sometimes painful condition. Remember, dry skin isn’t always just dry skin. Attend to it with a moisturizing cream; if that doesn’t work, switch to an antifungal cream.

    Please let us know how we can serve you best.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466
    http://www.danburypodiatrist.com/