• Considering elective foot surgery?

    It’s always up to you…

    Most foot surgery is elective.

    Elective means it’s always up to you, the patient, to decide if and when to have it.

    We are often asked when the right time is to consider surgery.

    In most cases, the best answer is when the pain is becoming intolerable.

    Most people who undergo elective foot surgery do so because they are experiencing pain from a particular condition on a daily basis.

    Not being able to wear certain shoes comfortably or exercise regularly are other reasons to consider foot surgery.

    If a condition such as a bunion or deformed toe is getting worse, we’ll recommend fixing the condition sooner than later to avoid a more serious situation.

    The rare circumstance of proceeding with elective foot surgery when pain isn’t present is in a diabetic condition.

    Many people with diabetes lose feeling in their feet. Correcting a foot deformity earlier than usual in this case is even more important, to avoid a major complication.

    Bunions, hammer toes, bone spurs, and plantar fasciitis are examples of foot conditions that may ultimately need to be resolved surgically.

    We always try as many non-surgical solutions as possible for these and most other foot conditions.

    Unfortunately, there are times when foot conditions do not respond to non-surgical methods.

    Since there are many things to consider when undergoing foot surgery, such as the impact on working, driving, and basic home needs, the ultimate decision is up to you.

    If you ever seek a second opinion, beware of the doctor who wants to push surgery on you.

    It might be the best option, but not unless conservative options have been exhausted.

    If you are considering foot surgery, we’d be happy to walk you through the process and determine if it’s the best option for you.

    We are here to serve you.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466

  • Neuropathy and Frostbite: A dangerous combination

    Neuropathy and Frostbite: A Dangerous Combination
    People who suffer from diabetes and neuropathy shoel know why it’s important to avoid frostbite. Neuropathy, a condition often experienced by those with diabetes, affects the body’s ability to feel, and therefore, hot and cold often cannot be discerned. A person with neuropathy is more prone to frostbite, since they cannot feel when cold is negatively affecting their skin. This puts the individual at greater risk for an amputation. Any cold injury should be treated promptly. First aid should include slow warming of the area and protection from additional trauma. If you have suffered a cold injury to your feet or are one of the many Americans that struggles with neuropathy, I invite you to visit me, at my office here in Danbury, CT. Call right away 203 791 0466 or request an appointment here.

  • Proper foot care can prevent many foot problems

    Proper foot care can prevent many foot problems
    Here are some tips for proper foot care:

    1. Wash your feet in warm water every day, using a mild soap. Do not soak your feet. Dry your feet well, especially between the toes.

    2. If the skin on your feet is dry, keep it moist by applying lotion after you wash and dry your feet. Do not put lotion between your toes.

    3. Check your feet every day for sores, blisters, redness, calluses, or any other problems. If you spot something unusual, give us a call.

    4. Check your toenails once a week. Trim your toenails with a nail clipper straight across. Do not round off the corners of toenails or cut down on the sides of the nails. After clipping, smooth the toenails with a nail file. IF YOU ARE DIABETIC, come in to see us regularly to have your nails trimmed. It is dangerous to do this yourself, as a nick or cut can become infected.

    5. Gently smooth corns and calluses with an emery board or pumice stone. Do this after your bath or shower, when your skin is soft. Move the emery board in only one direction.

    6. Always wear closed-toed shoes or slippers. Do not wear sandals and do not walk barefoot, even around the house.

    7. Always wear socks or stockings. Wear socks or stockings that fit your feet well and have soft elastic.

    8. Protect your feet from heat and cold. Wear shoes at the beach or on hot pavement. Wear socks at night if your feet get cold.

    9. Keep the blood flowing to your feet. Put your feet up when sitting, wiggle your toes and move your ankles several times a day, and don’t cross your legs for long periods of time.

    10. If you are diabetic, watch your diet and see us regularly for a checkup. Common foot problems can become dangerous for a diabetic.

    Take the time to take good care of your feet. In return, they’ll take you anywhere you want to go! Please call us at 203 791 0466 or request an appointment online

  • Heart disease is on the rise again!

    Heart disease is on the rise again…

    According to an article in the January 15th edition of the Wall Street Journal, heart disease is on the rise again in the U.S.

    The headline “Heart Disease Roars Back, Even in Healthy Places” couldn’t help but catch my eye.

    Even in a healthy state like Colorado, men and women in their 30s and 40s are seeing cardiologists with heart problems such as high blood pressure, irregular heart rhythm, and heart attacks.

    According to the article, “death rates from cardiovascular disease among people between the ages of 45 and 64 are rising in cities all across the country, including in some of the most unlikely places.”

    Two of the most common risk factors are obesity and diabetes.

    High blood pressure, drug and alcohol use, stress, and a lack of physical activity also play a role.

    These factors also increase the risk for people who are genetically disposed to heart disease, doctors say.

    What does this have to do with feet? Everything!

    Keeping your feet healthy so you can stay healthy is a mantra we’ve endorsed for years.

    We’ve seen how long-standing foot pain has led to inactivity.

    There is no better way to help prevent these risk factors than physical activity such as walking.

    According to some studies, walking 30 minutes 3-4 times per week can have a huge positive impact on blood pressure, diabetes, and heart health.

    We aren’t just in the business of solving foot problems; we’re here to help prevent serious health conditions such as heart disease.

    Is a long-standing foot condition keeping you from being physically active?

    Let us help you get back in the game… your heart will thank you!

    To a Healthy Heart,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466

  • Even a small sore on a diabetic foot can be a problem

    Even a small sore on a diabetic foot can be a big problem.

    Diabetes can often lead to decreased blood flow to the feet. Without the right amount of blood, a sore may not heal as well.

    Diabetes also often leads to decreased feeling in the feet. A sore on the bottom of the foot can easily go unnoticed because of numbness.

    This is why people with diabetes should inspect the bottom of their feet every day.

    Diabetes also often causes the immune system to function less than optimally. This means the body isn’t as good at healing a sore or an infection. Not having a good enough immune system along with poor circulation and sensation means people with diabetes must think of every sore as a potentially serious problem.

    The steps to take with a sore are keeping it clean, using an antibiotic cream, applying gauze to protect it from rubbing, and immediately scheduling an appointment.

    Of course, figuring out the cause of the sore–such as the possibility of shoes not fitting properly–is extremely important.

    Preventing an infection is first priority. If you or a loved one has diabetes, simply being aware of how risky it is to have something as simple as a small sore is the first step to avoiding a major complication.

    We specialize in keeping the feet of our patients with diabetes as healthy as possible. Preventing amputations starts with early intervention of any skin or nail concern in a person with diabetes.

    We are here to serve you.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466

  • Neuropathy Answers

    NEUROPATHY ANSWERS!

    Neuropathy is an interesting foot ailment, since many can suffer from it and not even know it.
    I’m Doctor Paul Betschart and today’s blog is about the condition called neuropathy, which I tackle as a podiatrist here in Danbury. The word “neuro” stands for the body’s nervous system. Your nervous system is what gives you the ability to feel and discern the difference between hot and cold, smooth and sharp. If the nerves become damaged in any way, the body, in this case, the foot, becomes numb. However, nerve damage can also result in shooting pains and muscle weakness that can be quite miserable.
    If you think that you might have neuropathy, I invite you to visit me, Doctor Betschart, at my office here in Danbury.
    We have an innovative treatment available to help reverse the nerve damage called Neurogenx.
    Get a FREE Consultation by calling 203-791-0466 or clicking the link below
    http://advancedfootandanklecenter.com/free-reports/
    http://bit.ly/1hidFiR

  • A Toe Nail Story

    The humble toenails; we pinch them with tight or narrow shoes. We wash them, trim them and polish them. We look at them every day. But do we give them credit for the important job they play?
    Toenails are a level of protection for your toes in the event of injury. The hard surface reinforces the bone, flesh and muscle that it covers. It’s critical for overall foot health to keep the toenails healthy and strong.
    Patients with Diabetes Must Stay on Top of Toenail Health
    Individuals with diabetes must monitor their overall body health. Diabetes can bring some serious complications and even something as seemingly insignificant as your toenails can be an indicator of a problem.
    Do your toenails look normal or have they become thick and brittle? You may have a fungus infection called onychomycosis. With this condition, the nails break off easily into sharp points that can cause tiny cuts in the surrounding tissue and skin. Any break in the skin can let bacteria in, especially in the feet where they are not easily observed.
    Often neuropathy goes hand in hand with diabetes. Neuropathy, a nerve damage disease, causes loss of sensation in the extremities like the feet. You may not be able to feel cuts, sores or other types of foot damage that can lead to foot ulcers.
    Good Foot Care Can Reduce the Risk of Infections
    Practice good foot care to limit your risk of developing toenail or other fungus:
    • Keep feet clean with a daily wash in soapy water, rinse and dry carefully, especially between the toes.
    • Don’t go barefoot. Wear sturdy, well-fitting shoes and warm socks for protection. Look for fabric that can wick moisture away from the feet; cotton does not do this well. Look for acrylic fabrics.
    • Wear shower shoes or flip flops when visiting public pools, showers, gyms and showers.
    • If you do a home pedicure, clean nail care tools thoroughly each time and sterilize with alcohol.
    • Stay away from artificial fingernails that may trap water and harbor fungus.
    Importantly, inspect your feet every day and call Advanced Foot & Ankle Center if you spot any change in appearance. Check toenails too for changes, especially in color or shape. Anemia sometimes causes toenails to appear paler or white. Rounded nails can be a sign of infection, lung disease or even certain kinds of cancer.
    We Can Help with any Toenail, Foot or Ankle Problems
    Please don’t hesitate to call us if you have any questions or concerns on your foot health. Dr. Paul Betschart, board certified podiatrist will quickly diagnose any problem and discuss the best treatment options with you. You can reach our Danbury office at (203) 791-0466 or our Middlebury office at (203) 754-2249 or reach us via the website. Your toes are valuable, don’t wait too long to address any problems you may see

  • What is Diabetic Foot?

    What is Diabetic Foot?

    It is estimated that nearly 25% of individuals that have been diagnosed with diabetes experience complications with their feet. Hi, I’m Doctor Paul Betschart, and I have a podiatry practice here in Danbury, CT. I know how difficult it can be sometimes to fight the condition known as diabetic foot. I’m here to help. Diabetic foot is a condition where small cuts and bruises on the feet can become dangerous, due to the fact that many diabetics experience neuropathy, which keeps them from detecting injuries. Therefore, a simple blister can turn into a foot ulcer that eats away at the flesh if not dealt with promptly. While it is important for diabetics to regularly check their feet for any injuries, it is equally necessary to have regular check-ups at your local podiatrist’s office. If you live in the Danbury area, please keep me in mind for your next appointment.

  • The Podiatrist’s War Against Foot Ulcers

    The Podiatrist’s War Against Foot Ulcers

    Foot ulcers. I shudder just thinking about them. I’m Doctor Paul Betschart, and I’m a podiatrist here in Danbury, CT. I am on a mission to help my patients combat foot ulcers and eliminate them entirely. Foot ulcers are sneaky, especially since they start off small in the form of a blister or abrasion, and then develop into an open wound. The most common suffers of this condition are diabetics who struggle with neuropathy. This is a dangerous combination, because neuropathy hinders the body from sensing the normal pains of a wound, thus potentially leaving it undetected and open for further development and infection. If you suffer with foot ulcers, or are concerned about the potential for developing one, I want to help you conquer them head-on! Stop by and see me, at my office in Danbury and let’s talk!

  • What causes Neuropathy?

    What Causes Neuropathy?

    If you suffer with the condition called neuropathy, it is important to find the root cause of the problem. Good day; I’m Doctor Paul Betschart and I operate a podiatry practice here in Danbury. Today, I would like to teach you about some of the main instigators of neuropathy. There are a number of factors that can trigger this condition. Because smoking often depletes the body of much-needed oxygen, appendages such as legs and feet can lose their feeling. Alcohol can also have negative effects, as it is a toxin that can poison the nerves. Those with high blood sugar can commonly develop neuropathy as well. Chemical exposure, including medicines can be causative factors as well.

    If you think you might be suffering with this condition, I want to help. I encourage you to make an appointment to see me, at my office in Danbury. I have some innovative treatments available that you won’t find anywhere else!