• Sores on the feet should not be taken lightly!

    Even a small sore on your foot shouldn’t be taken lightly.

    We’ve seen small sores on the foot become serious infections.

    Even if you wash your feet regularly, there’s still bacteria in this environment. If the wrong germ gets inside of an open sore, a serious infection can develop.

    This is more serious for people with diabetes, but everyone is at risk.

    At the very least, an open sore on your foot should be cleaned of any debris and dressed with a topical antibiotic such as Neosporin, Polysporin, or Triple antibiotic ointment and a Band-Aid.

    Also, make sure your shoe doesn’t rub on the spot. If pain and/or redness develops, be sure to make an appointment with us as soon as possible.

    Pain, swelling and redness are signs of an infection. Infection can travel from the skin down to the bone at a rapid pace in the wrong circumstance.

    We’ve seen small sores lead to an amputation of a toe due to inaction. Please don’t ignore a small sore on your foot, even if you believe you’re in excellent health.

    If you have a small sore that looks infected or isn’t showing signs of healing, schedule an appointment with us ASAP.

    We are here for your feet through these trying times

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466
    http://www.danburypodiatrist.com/

  • Proper foot care can prevent many foot problems

    Proper foot care can prevent many foot problems
    Here are some tips for proper foot care:

    1. Wash your feet in warm water every day, using a mild soap. Do not soak your feet. Dry your feet well, especially between the toes.

    2. If the skin on your feet is dry, keep it moist by applying lotion after you wash and dry your feet. Do not put lotion between your toes.

    3. Check your feet every day for sores, blisters, redness, calluses, or any other problems. If you spot something unusual, give us a call.

    4. Check your toenails once a week. Trim your toenails with a nail clipper straight across. Do not round off the corners of toenails or cut down on the sides of the nails. After clipping, smooth the toenails with a nail file. IF YOU ARE DIABETIC, come in to see us regularly to have your nails trimmed. It is dangerous to do this yourself, as a nick or cut can become infected.

    5. Gently smooth corns and calluses with an emery board or pumice stone. Do this after your bath or shower, when your skin is soft. Move the emery board in only one direction.

    6. Always wear closed-toed shoes or slippers. Do not wear sandals and do not walk barefoot, even around the house.

    7. Always wear socks or stockings. Wear socks or stockings that fit your feet well and have soft elastic.

    8. Protect your feet from heat and cold. Wear shoes at the beach or on hot pavement. Wear socks at night if your feet get cold.

    9. Keep the blood flowing to your feet. Put your feet up when sitting, wiggle your toes and move your ankles several times a day, and don’t cross your legs for long periods of time.

    10. If you are diabetic, watch your diet and see us regularly for a checkup. Common foot problems can become dangerous for a diabetic.

    Take the time to take good care of your feet. In return, they’ll take you anywhere you want to go! Please call us at 203 791 0466 or request an appointment online

  • Dry skin isn’t always dry skin!

    Most people don’t realize that dry skin on the bottom of the feet could be a sign of Athlete’s Foot. Dry skin isn’t always just dry skin. It doesn’t matter whether you’re 20 years old or 80 years old, dry skin could mean you have Fungus in the skin.

    Athlete’s Foot doesn’t always cause itching like we think it does. If dry skin goes untreated, it could lead to fungus in the nails. No one wants that! If dry skin doesn’t respond to the typical moisturizing creams or lotions you can get over-the-counter, then switching to an anti-fungal cream would be the best option. An inexpensive over-the-counter anti-fungal cream such as Clotrimazole is a good option. Apply it to the bottom of your feet twice a day. If you have dryness between the toes, apply a small amount there as well.

    If you have diabetes, it’s best to consult with our office before using a product like this. Some people are just genetically predisposed to the dry version of athlete’s foot.

    If you have chronically dry skin, it’s a good idea to use an anti-fungal cream just in case fungus is present.

    If you notice a yellow, white, or brown discoloration of a toenail, having it treated by us immediately is the best option. A discolored toenail left untreated can become a very ugly and sometimes painful condition. Remember, dry skin isn’t always just dry skin. Attend to it with a moisturizing cream; if that doesn’t work, switch to an antifungal cream.

    Please let us know how we can serve you best.

    To Healthy Feet,

    Dr. Betschart
    203-791-0466
    http://www.danburypodiatrist.com/