Dropped Something On Your Foot?

It could be worse than you think…

Dropping something on your foot can lead to long-term pain. We’ve seen it happen many times. A broken bone can be the least of the concerns.

Injury to a nerve can be the most significant problem. We never dismiss an injury to the top of the foot when an x-ray is negative (no broken bone).

We’ve seen many patients who have suffered for months because of an injury to a nerve. If you drop something on the top of your foot either at home or work, simply being aware of what can occur will help to keep you out of danger.

In addition to rest, ice and elevation, keeping pressure off the top of the foot is important. Wearing looser fitting shoes or sandals, if the weather allows, will help to avoid further irritation to the nerves.

Avoid wrapping your foot in an ace bandage. You want as little pressure on the top of the foot as possible.

Because more can go wrong than just a broken bone, we recommend seeing us as opposed to an urgent care clinic for injuries to the feet.

If you have had months of pain after dropping something on your foot, we’d be happy to evaluate it. We enjoy serving you!

And Happy New Year,

Dr. Betschart
844-375-7622
http://dev-danbury-podiatrist.pantheonsite.io/

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