Even a small sore can mean big problems for people with diabetes

Diabetes can often lead to decreased blood flow to the feet. Without the right amount of blood, a sore may not heal as well. Diabetes also often leads to decreased feeling in the feet. A sore on the bottom of the foot can easily go unnoticed because of numbness. This is why people with diabetes should inspect the bottom of their feet every day. Diabetes also often causes the immune system to function less than optimally. This means the body isn’t as good at healing a sore or an infection. Not having a good enough immune system along with poor circulation and sensation means people with diabetes must think of every sore as a potentially serious problem. The steps to take if you get a sore are keeping it clean, using an antibiotic cream, applying gauze to protect it from rubbing, and immediately scheduling an appointment. Of course, figuring out the cause of the sore–such as the possibility of shoes not fitting properly, or the presence of a foot deformity –is extremely important. If you or a loved one has diabetes, simply being aware of how risky it is to have something as simple as a small sore is the first step to avoiding a major complication. We specialize in keeping the feet of our patients with diabetes as healthy as possible. Preventing amputations starts with early intervention of any skin or nail concern in a person with diabetes. We are here for any foot problem at any time

Author
Paul Betschart, DPM Dr. Betschart has over 26 years of experience in treating patients of all ages with all kinds of foot and ankle conditions. His mission is to provide you with helpful information about foot and ankle issues and the latest developments in healthcare.

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